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The Gatley Step men's loafer adds classic refinement to any outfit, sartorially upgrading a simply casual look to one that's proudly smart.

 

EXTON WALK

DELSIN WING

DARBY LIMIT

GATLEY LIMIT

This handsome loafer is easy to wear, and a versatile addition to any wardrobe. Wear it for a classic summer look that will never go out of style

• Slip on the Gatley Step loafer to properly finish an outfit. Its slim, elegant shape adds a dose of grown-up refinement.

• The classic brush-off effect on the leather evokes the shoemaker's craft – and demonstrates the quality of the materials.

• Bare those ankles: A loafer looks great worn without socks. Try it!

Contrary to their name, loafers are anything but lazy: In fact, they're a hard-working shoe that's at home in both the boardroom and the beach house. Make a smart impact this summer by pairing them with a tailored jacket (preferably unlined) and formal cropped trousers. And because it's warm out, go without socks – you can pull it off.

 

Originally from Norway, loafers quickly became a global sensation, popular with style-conscious travelers and locals alike. Not as formal as traditional oxfords, the loafer had a more casual reputation – until style-savvy gentlemen in the world's fashion capitals made it their own.

Seen here: The loafer in London

AERONAUTICAL DESIGN ENGINEER JOSH MILLER WEARS THE GATLEY STEP

North Londoner Josh Miller, 29, puts in long days at his workshop, restoring vintage airplanes and designing custom pieces for vintage plane collectors. Rooted in classic, no-nonsense workwear, his personal style is suited to both the workshop and weekend.?And in his downtime, he masters the smart-casual look.

How has your style evolved over ?the years?
I am definitely wearing more tailored clothes … now I have all my jeans tailored to fit me. Also, I’m much more into quality over labels.

What would you usually wear when you’re not at work?
I like good quality collarless cotton shirting, jeans, smarter trousers and waistcoats – generally all still workwear-inspired, though.